AMAZING Video: Making Money Online

Featured

So many people come to us and say hey,
I want to make $4000 by the end of the month”.

My simple answer is eek.. although I have seen
people make $4000 or more in their first month
Making Money Online,
it is rare..

Look..

If you do have realistic expectations..

Like maybe wanting to make $500 your first month

Then here is what you need to doGo to video for details!

Let us show you we are one HUGE family of
great people who want to legitimately help you succeed!

_____________________________________________________

Mad Men’s Final Word on the 1960s … And Today

TIME
Mad Men’s Final Word on the 1960s … And Today

History News Network

This post is in partnership with the History News Network, the website that puts the news into historical perspective. The article below was originally published at HNN.

April 5 marks the beginning of the end for Mad Men, and viewers anxiously await a final coda to creator Matthew Weiner’s tale. Will advertising executive Don Draper’s tumultuous peaks and valleys experiences of the 1960s conclude with happiness or tragedy?

The 1960 film, The Apartment, and presidential history during that decade, may hint at an answer.

Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner has cited this Academy Award winning movie as an important inspiration for his serial drama. Since The Apartment ended on a positive note with the main character finding love, viewers might expect a similar conclusion to Weiner’s production. More significantly, The Apartment stands as a cultural symbol of the youthful optimism for social change that many Americans associate with the 1960s. Along with the defeat of Richard Nixon by the youthful, vigorous John Kennedy in the 1960 presidential election, The Apartment’s director, Billy Wilder, helped create today’s conventional wisdom that the year 1960 represented a break from the staid conformity characteristic of the 1950s.

In The Apartment, Director Wilder presents protagonist C.C. “Bud” Baxter as a young, bored number-cruncher (played by Jack Lemmon) in the accounting division of a corporation known as Consolidated Life Insurance. There are two primary settings where the characters interact—the vast 19th floor of seemingly endless rows of desks in the skyscraper where Baxter works, and Baxter’s small apartment in New York City.

The story’s problem emerges when Consolidated Life’s personnel director Jeffrey Sheldrake asks Baxter if the rumors are true that married senior executives have borrowed Baxter’s apartment to conduct secret extramarital affairs. Sheldrake’s intent, we soon discover, is not to reprimand Baxter, but to borrow his key so that Sheldrake may have exclusive privileges to bring his own mistresses to Baxter’s den of iniquity.

Although Sheldrake rewards the junior executive with a 27th floor private office and a bowler hat to boot, Baxter soon regrets the decision when he finds himself having to choose between his career and his love for Fran Kubelik, an elevator operator (played by Shirley MacLaine) in his company’s building. When Baxter discovers that Kubelik is one of Sheldrake’s conquests, he must either cling to his newfound place on the corporate ladder or fight for this damsel in distress. In witnessing Baxter’s decision to abandon the company in exchange for romantic love, we recognize a rejection of the 1950s culture of conformity which sociologists, novelists, and journalists portrayed in books such as The Power Elite, The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit, and The Organization Man.

The Apartment concludes with Baxter’s rejection of conformist and debased corporate culture, but Mad Men presents Don Draper as still engaged in the struggle to maintain individual autonomy in the complacent, risk-averse, and conformist white-collar world. In order to carry the drama forward through the 1960s, Weiner created a character more complex than Wilder’s Baxter. Viewers balance Don’s misogyny against his elevation of his secretary Peggy Olson to a position of copy editor. His infidelity is placed in the context of his troubled past growing up in a whorehouse. In the Darwinian jungle of corporate America, furthermore, Draper’s ambition and authoritarianism appear somehow necessary for a man who began without inherited wealth or business contacts.

In Season One, Weiner used the Nixon-Kennedy presidential contest as a Hegelian thesis-antithesis recasting of The Apartment’s theme. Nixon hires Draper’s advertising firm, Sterling Cooper, to help publicize his 1960 presidential campaign. The upstart Kennedy’s victory appears as a tragic defeat for the company’s corporate elite that seeks to perpetuate the conformist 1950s. The image of a triumphant Kennedy symbolizes the hope for change in the new decade, and Draper appears to represent this icon of youthful optimism. In one episode, a character describes the youthful, handsome, and decisive Draper as Kennedyesque—distinct from the common corporate type–saying “You’re JFK!”

But Draper identifies more with Nixon. Somewhat surprisingly, Weiner’s protagonist thinks Nixon’s defeat says more about how the candidate’s handlers failed to present his background than about the spirit of the age. When Draper sees Nixon, he says, he sees himself—a self-made man of the people. Draper’s self-image is not as a member of the power elite, but neither as an idealist. He is a working class man pursuing the American Dream. While many of the Mad Men characters—including Draper—appear to admire Kennedy, the president’s tragic assassination in 1963 casts a pall over the ebullient optimism which Draper, his family, and work associates embodied in the first three seasons.

Given that the program is concluding during 1969—Nixon’s first year as president–Washington Post opinion writer Alyssa Rosenberg has posited that Nixon was “the key to understanding Don Draper.” In Rosenberg’s view, Nixon’s ability to come back from multiple political defeats—including the 1960 presidential campaign and a failed 1962 bid for governor of California—appeared as the model for Draper’s similar skill at surviving setbacks by reinventing himself.

The Kennedy-Nixon dialectic certainly serves as one way of understanding the tension between hope and cynicism in Mad Men, but another politician–Ronald Reagan—may provide the model that Weiner has in mind for Draper’s ultimate fate. Draper’s creative genius and macho cool seems more similar to Reagan’s Hollywood confidence and calm than to Nixon’s calculated professionalism. While Nixon and Draper certainly reinvented themselves multiple times, Draper does not seem to share the dark side that Nixon’s closest aides identified in the former president.

Reagan’s sunny optimism wedded to “tough love” conservatism seems to embody the synthesis that Draper will need to embrace in the years following the Kennedy and Nixon administrations. Similar to Reagan, who was elected governor of California in 1967 (and again in 1971), Draper survived by balancing artistic and practical responses to challenges. Hollywood plays an important role in Draper’s professional and personal lives. Reagan’s divorce and remarriage serve as another parallel with Draper (and not with Kennedy or Nixon). Finally, Reagan’s penchant for concealing his inner self appears akin to the mysterious Draper, who hides his true identity as Dick Whitman from even his closest friends, who are few.

If The Apartment served as a Muse for Weiner’s Mad Men, viewers can expect Don Draper to walk off the screen this year facing a sunny future. Just as Billy Wilder’s film portrayed the protagonists as rejecting 1950s corporate conformity, Mad Men began in 1960 with a theme of individual liberation. The Apartment did not require C.C. Baxter and Fran Kubelik to sacrifice the ideal of romantic love, and Mad Men has vindicated that choice by celebrating the 1960s office culture as a space of social revolution.

But as 1969 draws to a close, Draper will need to engage with the rise of corporate power during the Age of Reagan, as historian Sean Wilentz has characterized the 1974-2008 United States. Indeed, one of the subtexts of Mad Men has been the rising importance of work in the lives of Americans. Weiner’s narrative has shown how corporate America’s adoption of the 1960s liberation movements strengthened rather than weakened capitalism’s roots in the United States. In many cases, Don Draper and his colleagues Pete, Ron, Joan, and Peggy formed closer relationships with their colleagues and their firm than with their own wives, husbands, and children. Weiner surely knows that the show’s fans want those bonds to last a lifetime.

Thomas J. Carty, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of American Studies at Springfield College.

Here’s Snoop Dogg Sitting on the Iron Throne

TIME
Here’s Snoop Dogg Sitting on the Iron Throne

Ah, the replica Iron Throne. Anyone who sits in the (very uncomfortable-looking) iron chair from Game of Thrones looks like a total boss, and Snoop Dogg is no exception. He enjoyed his faux moment ruling over Westeros at the #CatchTheThrone party at SXSW, and thank god, Game of Thrones tweeted it.

Still, Snoop Dogg isn’t a player in the Game of Thrones. He’s a playa in the rap game, and he’s wearing an amazing white vest and a gold chain to remind everyone of that.

Enjoy this photo of Snoop looking fresh and completely unfazed to be sitting on the Iron Throne.

Here’s What Too Many Cooks Would Look Like If It Were About U.S. Politics

TIME
Here’s What Too Many Cooks Would Look Like If It Were About U.S. Politics

If you loved Too Many Cooks, you’ll love CNN’s version of the viral internet sensation.

With a cast including everyone from Barack Obama to Vladimir Putin to Sarah Palin to Kim Jung Un, the fake ad casts U.S. politics as a bad ’80s sitcom, complete with cheesy footage of hunky cowboys and glorious bald eagles.

There’s also a terrifying demon sheep at the end that will haunt your dreams more than the image of John McCain doing the robot dance.

 

This Couple Is Getting Married 38 Times Around the World

 

On Saturday, Rhiann Woodyard and Cheetah Platt are getting married in Thailand.

They’re also getting married in Singapore, Australia, Fiji, and the United States, and they’ve already been married in Colombia, Spain, Ireland, Morocco, Egypt, Kenya and India. Each of these destinations is a stop on the three-month “wedding tour” they’re taking around the world.

The couple, who normally live in California, came up with this elaborate plan after they became increasingly frustrated with the mounting costs that came along with wedding planning. In their budget, they could afford an “acceptable wedding, but not their “perfect wedding,” Platt tells PEOPLE.

On top of that, they couldn’t decide what they wanted. They liked night weddings, but they also saw the appeal of getting married during the day. Outdoor weddings were nice, but so were indoor weddings.

So, instead of starting a pro-con list to choose, they decided not to decide at all. Instead, they bought a $100 tux and a $100 dress, packed them in their respective backpacks and set off get married all over the world, as many times as they could.

Still, just like a normal wedding, their adventure took some planning. And with a 12-country tour not so easy to pull off, it took them eight months to plan the whole thing, Woodyard says, even though the only components of their trip that they figured out before they left were transportation and lodging.

In addition to how to get there and where they’re going to sleep, the rest of their trip is up in the air. None of their weddings is planned; rather, they find each “venue” as they go.

Letting Nature Decide

In Colombia, they set off on a hike in the jungle and found their spot along the way. In Thailand, they decided only the day before where they wanted to wed.

“We’re using nature as the venue,” Woodyard says. “In terms of the ceremony, the only rule is that we say our vows.”

This spontaneous attitude towards marriage may be unconventional, but for them, the mechanics work. Each wedding lasts only two to four minutes, depending on the time constraints dictated by the ceremony’s locale.

No outside officiator is present during their weddings, either. Both Woodyard and Platt were ordained online and are conducting “self-unifying ceremonies,” where they marry each other. It’s a practice that’s legal in several states, and “once we found that out,” Platt says, “we thought that is us.”

 

One Rule About the Dress

While the ceremony is conducted without restrictions, the couple did introduce one special requirement for their travels: They have to wear white. – a rule that mostly came about because they thought it was cute.

“We’re dorky and we like to match,” Woodyard admits.

They also thought it was a way to make the experience even more personal.

“We wanted this to be really be our wedding,” Platt says. “And in our wedding, we wear all white.”

 

Budgetary Restrictions

Most three-month-long international trips are pretty pricey, but Woodyard and Platt were committed to doing this on the cheap. To start, they refrained from being too selective when considering locations, not caring where they went, so long as they went somewhere.

“If we were picky, it would have been astronomically more expensive,” Platt says.

They spend about a week in each country, sometimes more or less (a number of cities in Thailand over the course of 12 days, but fewer than 48 hours in Egypt). Their nights are spent in AirBnB rented apartments or cheap hotels, and they fly budget airlines to get from one destination to the next. They also set up their own sort of registry that allowed their friends and family to fund their plane tickets to Morocco, or a few nights’ stay in Ireland, rather than gifting a new toaster.

Their families aren’t only involved financially. It may just be the two of them on this months’ long adventure, but both Platt and Woodyard wanted to make sure their loved ones were a part of the experience.

“We want it to be interactive,” Platt says. “We don’t want it to be individual.”

 

Linked to Loved Ones

And while their loved ones haven’t been able to tag along in their travels, they’ve still been a part of their experience. Thanks to the Internet, they’re in constant communication. So much so, in fact, that Platt says, “It does feel like we’re on the adventure with us.”

And for one of their stops, they’ll be able to participate in person. On April 18, the two plan to marry in Big Bear Lake, California, with their friends and family watching.

The newly married (and soon to be married again) pair may be seeing the world, but if anything, their three-month-long wedding is only making them want to travel even more.

As Woodyard says: “It’s been enough time for a wedding and to meet people and to know that we want to go back.”

This article originally appeared on People.com.

No Dog Has Ever Been This Fascinated by Carrots

TIME
No Dog Has Ever Been This Fascinated by Carrots

It’s always fun to see what dogs will get really excited about. Maymo the beagle, for example, got super pumped when his humans tied carrots to the ceiling fan, creating a magical swirling universe of vegetables.

To be fair, Maymo is interested even before the carrots start moving. In the above video, he inspects them, considers biting them, sniffs them and watches them dangle for a while, all while they’re totally still. But then somebody turns on the fan and everything gets so much more exciting. He shows off some real ingenuity, too, climbing up on a table to get closer to the carrots.

In the end, Maymo is victorious. He manages to snag a carrot, which means he has beaten the evil swirling carrot monster and also gotten his day’s dose of vitamin A.

(h/t Mashable)

These Corgis Just Predicted the Royal Baby’s Name

TIME
These Corgis Just Predicted the Royal Baby’s Name

The online-betting site Ladbrokes organized a corgi race to encourage people to bet on the name of the next royal baby, due in April.

In the ad, 10 dogs are wearing pieces of fabric with popular suggested names for Prince William and Kate Middleton’s second child. Gamblers are also betting on the sex of the baby.

The corgi sporting the name Alexandra won the race. But while Ladbrokes hopes people will watch the video and then go online and bet on that name, we’re pretty confident dog lovers are only watching this video to see corgis frolicking and rolling around in the grass.

However, it remains to be seen whether this video will cause a surge in people betting on when corgis will become extinct.

 

Calorie Count Coming Soon to a Can of Guinness Near You

The largest alcohol company in the world is preparing to add calorie counts to many of its best-selling brands.

Diageo announced Thursday that the nutritional information would begin to appear on bottles, the Wall Street Journal reports, and the first brand to get labeled will probably be Smirnoff. The new policy will take hold in the next few months, and will likely affect lines like Johnnie Walker and Guinness as well.

Whether the new labels will stop anyone from ordering another vodka soda remains to be seen. A 2013 study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon found that displaying calorie counts and recommendations in restaurants did not have an impact on consumer choice.

[WSJ]

Man Who Was Mistakenly Invited to Bachelor Party Definitely Going Anyway

TIME
Man Who Was Mistakenly Invited to Bachelor Party Definitely Going Anyway

A Seattle man who was accidentally copied on an email chain about a Philadelphia bachelor party is going anyway.

Joey DiJulio of Seattle got the first email from these people he didn’t know on Feb. 11. After a few weeks of messages about Jeff Minetti’s bachelor party in Philadelphia at the end of the month, he replied, explaining that they mixed him up with someone else. That started a whole new email chain, with Minetti’s friends saying he should totally come anyway, and the groom confirming, adding that DiJulio should come to the wedding, too.

According to Q13 FOX’s play-by-play of this saga, DiJulio set up a GoFundMe page “Random Bachelor Party” earlier this week to raise $1276 to fund the trip, and surpassed the goal within 24 hours. Now he is raising money to go toward the couple’s honeymoon.

This comment on DiJulio’s crowd-funding site seems to sum up the overwhelming turnout for this unusual cause: “Strangers really are just friends we haven’t met yet.”

 

Here’s What The Millionaire Matchmaker Thinks About 7 Viral Proposals



Getty Images

For those who narrowly escaped the crushing romantic pressure that Valentine’s Day puts on relationships, the worst is still to come. March 20 marks not only the first day of Spring, but also National Proposal Day, which, yes, is a real thing.

Of course, on the Internet, it always feels like it’s National Proposal Day. There’s a new viral engagement video almost every week — and whether it involve flashmobs of professional Broadway dancers or flashmobs of pugs, each new one seems to top the last.

“If you’re a private person, then it’s going to scare the crap out of you,” says relationship guru Patti Stanger, star of Bravo’s The Millionaire Matchmaker. “But if you’re a person who’s over the top, then go for it.”

It’s best to know if your intended public proposal is “adorable” or “ew” before you pop the question. So TIME had Stanger judge seven different types, although she doesn’t think a viral proposal is necessary.

The Millionaire Matchmaker airs Sundays on BRAVO at 10/9c.

This Road in China Got Covered in Almost 15,000 Lb. of Live Catfish

TIME
This Road in China Got Covered in Almost 15,000 Lb. of Live Catfish

When the door of a delivery truck in the southern Chinese province of Guizhou swung open, 15,000 lb. (6,800 kg) of catfish came spilling out, covering the road in a flopping, scaly mess.

Remarkably, with the help of community members and the local fire department, a two-hour rescue effort was undertaken and the shipment was not wasted, according to the Shanghaiist. Their task was arduous but simple — workers basically sprayed the fish with water to keep them alive while others picked them up and returned them to the truck.

And thanks to their efforts, these fish out of water finally made it to the dinner table.

Thousands Of Kilograms Of Catfish Scatter In Kaili
ChinaFotoPress—Getty ImagesWith the help of fire crews of Development Zone Squadron in Qiandongnan Fire Detachment and local people, the catfish were loaded on the truck again.

ChinaFotoPress—Getty ImagesThousands of kilograms of catfish scatter across the road in the Kaili Development Zone in Qiandongnan Miao and Dong Autonomous Prefecture on March 17, 2015 in Kaili, Guizhou province of China

[Shanghaiist]

This Road in China Got Covered in Almost 15,000 lbs of Live Catfish

TIME
This Road in China Got Covered in Almost 15,000 lbs of Live Catfish

When the door of a delivery truck in the southern Chinese province of Guizhou swung open, 15,000 lb. (6,800 kg) of catfish came spilling out, covering the road in a flopping, scaly mess.

Remarkably, with the help of community members and the local fire department, a two-hour rescue effort was undertaken and the shipment was not wasted, according to the Shanghaiist. Their task was arduous but simple — workers basically sprayed the fish with water to keep them alive while others picked them up and returned them to the truck.

And thanks to their efforts, these fish out of water finally made it to the dinner table.

Thousands Of Kilograms Of Catfish Scatter In Kaili
ChinaFotoPress—Getty ImagesWith the help of fire crews of Development Zone Squadron in Qiandongnan Fire Detachment and local people, the catfish were loaded on the truck again.

ChinaFotoPress—Getty ImagesThousands of kilograms of catfish scatter across the road in the Kaili Development Zone in Qiandongnan Miao and Dong Autonomous Prefecture on March 17, 2015 in Kaili, Guizhou province of China

[Shanghaiist]

Vernal Equinox: New Google Doodle Celebrates First Day of Spring

TIME
Vernal Equinox: New Google Doodle Celebrates First Day of Spring

The Sun, the moon, and Google are celebrating the official start of spring — this year’s vernal equinox on March 20 will include a solar eclipse, a supermoon and a stop-animation Google Doodle.

As TIME wrote last year, the vernal equinox is when “earth’s axis is angled such that the world gets an equal amount of daylight and night,” signaling the start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere.

This year’s spring begins with a celestial bang. Most of Europe and parts of northern Africa and Asia will be treated with a partial solar eclipse and the few inhabitants of the Danish Faroe Islands and Norway’s Svalbard archipelago will be lucky enough to witness a total eclipse. Or, you can watch a streaming broadcast here.

In parts of Europe, Google is adding an animated eclipse to their Doodle.

Fans hoping for a grandiose stargazing experience will be disappointed to learn that the supermoon, when our moon’s elliptical orbit reaches its closest point to earth, will be invisible because a new moon is required for a solar eclipse.

The Google Doodle welcomes springtime with a lovely line of flowers that grow and bloom before a bumblebee lands in the middle to collect pollen.

New Google Doodle Celebrates First Day of Spring

TIME
New Google Doodle Celebrates First Day of Spring

The Sun, the moon, and Google are celebrating the official start of spring — this year’s vernal equinox on March 20 will include a solar eclipse, a supermoon and a stop-animation Google Doodle.

As TIME wrote last year, the vernal equinox is when “earth’s axis is angled such that the world gets an equal amount of daylight and night,” signaling the start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere.

This year’s spring begins with a celestial bang. Most of Europe and parts of northern Africa and Asia will be treated with a partial solar eclipse and the few inhabitants of the Danish Faroe Islands and Norway’s Svalbard archipelago will be lucky enough to witness a total eclipse. Or, you can watch a streaming broadcast here.

In parts of Europe, Google is adding an animated eclipse to their Doodle.

Fans hoping for a grandiose stargazing experience will be disappointed to learn that the supermoon, when our moon’s elliptical orbit reaches its closest point to earth, will be invisible because a new moon is required for a solar eclipse.

The Google Doodle welcomes springtime with a lovely line of flowers that grow and bloom before a bumblebee lands in the middle to collect pollen.