My friend quit his job: He told his Boss to Take a hike

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My good friend quit his job and told his Boss to Take a hike!

After he tripled his income from his day job following
“The System”quit

Here Is The System He Used…

(It’s No Cost To You)

In the video at that link he tells his story.
It’s really worth watching. My friend is a
regular guy and just knew how to follow some
SIMPLE instructions.

Here’s How He Did It …

To Your Success!

P.S. I know a few of you like your jobs… but if
you asked most people out there if they would
like to tell their Boss to take a hike…I think you
would find that most people would!
.
Here’s How You Can Do It …
.

 

..

Ukraine Envoy Defiant but Hopeful About Outcome of Talks

A Ukrainian envoy says he is hopeful four-way Ukraine talks in Geneva Thursday will deter further Russian military aggression in his country.  But he warns Ukraine will do whatever it takes to protect its territory if diplomatic efforts fail to resolve this standoff.   Foreign ministers from the United States, European Union, Russia and Ukraine are to hold crisis talks Thursday in an effort to prevent the standoff between Russia and Ukraine from spiraling out of control.   Ukrainian Ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva Yurii Klymenko says it will not be easy to restore stability in his country, nor to get Russia to back off from its territorial designs.  But he says he believes the talks could find a way to work toward a peaceful settlement.   The ambassador said the issue of the Federalization of Ukraine is not on the agenda, adding that his government is committed to decentralization, to granting more power to the different regions.  But Klymenko said the government opposes Russia’s demand Ukraine become a federalized state, which is seen as a ploy by Moscow to weaken the role of the central government in Kyiv.   “This meeting will not consider the issues pertaining to the internal affairs of Ukraine, but measures for the escalation of pressures on the borders of Ukraine, as well as ways for resuming trade and economic relations between Ukraine and Russia based on mutually profitable market principles,” he said.  “Ukraine is persistently opposing efforts by Moscow to disrupt Geneva talks under any concocted pretext.”  According to the ambassador, Ukraine considers negotiations as the only option for settling conflict.  But he told VOA if Russia continues its aggressive actions, Ukraine is ready to use all means of self defense, according to article 51 of the UN Charter, which gives states the right to take up arms.  “If there will be any aggression, a blatant aggression against Ukraine, against its Eastern and southern regions, so Ukraine will use its right of self-defense,” he warned.  “I am telling you as a diplomat…  Not only the Ukrainian army will defend the country, but every Ukrainian will defend its motherland.”  The foreign ministers hope their combined diplomatic effort Thursday will succeed in breaking the logjam between Moscow and Kyiv.  But if there is no breakthrough, the United States and European Union have threatened to impose more economic sanctions on Russia.

Credit: Voice of America

The World’s Best Margherita Pizza Comes From Down Under

If you’re on a quest to find the best margherita pizza on the planet, don’t bother booking a trip to Italy, which was probably your plan. Instead, get yourself a ticket to Australia.

The results are in from this year’s World Pizza Championship, and the winner is Australian chef Johnny Di Francesco, who owns a restaurant just outside Melbourne. Di Francesco’s family hails from Naples, so at least there’s that. Also, his nickname is apparently “Mr. Pizza,” so you can’t really argue with that.

The competition, held each year in Parma, Italy, defines a margherita pizza as a pie “under 35cm in diameter, cooked in a wood-fired oven and contain only certain ingredients, such as peeled tomatoes, cheese, garlic, olive oil and salt,” according to the Guardian.

Hundreds of pizza-makers from 35 countries entered the championships, but Di Francesco managed to set himself apart. His secret? Italian-imported flour, high-quality buffalo mozzarella and fresh basil. That sounds pretty tame, so we assume he’s just unwilling to reveal his real secret.

Source: TIME >> Sections >> Newsfeed

Armed Pro-Russians Push into Ukrainian Towns

Armored personnel carriers with armed men riding on top and flying Russian flags rolled into the Ukrainian city of Sloviansk near the Russian border Wednesday. Some of the men claim they are Ukrainian soldiers who have switched sides to the pro-Russians who control several government buildings in town.Armed pro-Russians also hold municipal buildings in Donetsk, another city where separatists demand referendums on splitting with Ukraine to join Russia.Ukraine launched an operation Tuesday to try to take back the buildings.Reports differ on whether shots were fired, if there are casualties, and who controls what.NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen says the alliance has decided on a series of immediate steps to reinforce its military footprint in eastern Europe, in response to Russia’s moves. “We will have more planes in the air, more ships on the water, and more readiness on the land. For example, air police and aircraft will fly more sorties over the Baltic region, allied ships will deploy to the Baltic sea, the eastern Mediterranean, and elsewhere as required.”Russian President Vladimir Putin says the growing crisis in Ukraine has brought the country to the brink of civil war.The Kremlin says Mr. Putin made his comment during a telephone call Tuesday with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.President Putin accused the Ukrainian government of pursuing an “anti-constitutional” path by using force against the pro-Russian demonstrators who have taken over official buildings in 10 southeastern Ukrainian towns and cities.The Kremlin says the Russian and German leaders hope Thursday’s talks in Geneva between the European Union, Russia, Ukraine, and the United States will show the importance of finding a peaceful solution.

Credit: Voice of America

3 Dead, 290 Missing After South Korea Ferry Sinks

South Korean officials say three people are dead and at least 290 missing after a ferry sank off the country’s southern coast Wednesday.The boat was carrying more than 459 people, mostly students, to the resort island of Jeju when it sank in what appeared to be calm conditions.Many are feared to be trapped inside the submerged ship or stranded in the surrounding waters, which were only 12 degrees Celsius.Dozens of helicopters and ships, including a U.S. Navy amphibious assault vessel, are involved in the massive search and rescue effort. South Korean Navy SEALs are searching the sunken vessel, but officials warn that those trapped inside may not have survived.Survivors were taken to the nearby island of Jindo. Kim Tae-young, a student, said he acted quickly when the ship started to lean.”I held a handrail and moved toward the right side of the ferry to ride a helicopter as water kept coming in,” he said. “Water kept coming in?” “Yes, trash cans were floating and water came up to my neck.”Many of the passengers said they were initially told to stay in their seats and not try to escape. Yoo Ho-shil said when he felt the ferry began to list, he knew he had to act. ”No, I could see it. I felt in my bones that I had to escape when I saw water was flooding an aisle next to a cabin.“ Most of the passengers were high school students headed to Jeju island on a school outing. The students attend a school in Ansan, near Seoul. Classes were dismissed Wednesday as anxious parents gathered, waiting for news about their children. Park Sung-ho is a father of one of the students. “I can’t even describe how I feel now. I was super nervous. Even specially trained soldiers will have a hard time if they get stranded at sea. Then what a shock it must be to those kids? I’m sure it must have felt devastating. It’s even worse for the parents.”South Korean television broadcast images of the ship, as it slowly turned perpendicular to the sea before disappearing beneath the surface.The 146-meter-long ferry departed late Tuesday from the western port of Incheon. It sank about 20 kilometers off the island of Byungpoong. The reason for the incident is not clear. Some passengers reported hearing a loud noise before the ferry started sinking. Heavy fog was reported in the area on Tuesday evening, but it is not known whether this contributed to the sinking.

Credit: Voice of America

Drone Footage Captures Stunning Aerial Views of New York City

Sometimes the best way to appreciate New York City’s majestic beauty is to take a step back and observe it from afar — or from up high. This aerial footage captured by photographer Randy Scott Slavin, with the help of a drone, lets you explore the city’s busy streets and glittering skyscrapers on a sunny day. It makes you feel like you’re a bird, or like you have a magic carpet or something.

Plus, the city seems so much cleaner and less smelly from this perspective.

(h/t Gizmodo)

Source: TIME >> Sections >> Newsfeed

China Growth Slows to 7.4 Percent

China’s economy grew 7.4 percent in the first quarter of this year, the slowest rate in 18 months for the world’s second biggest economy.The growth rate exceeded economists’ expectations. But still, it was down from the 7.7 percent rate of growth in the last three months of 2013. Beijing has set a target growth rate of 7.5 percent in 2014 – a relatively modest goal. But for now, Chinese leaders appear to see this as tolerable, as they guide the economy toward a more sustainable model based on domestic consumption. Premier Li Keqiang last week ruled out any major stimulus, such as the one employed following the 2008 global financial downturn.Julian Evans-Pritchard with the Singapore-based Capital Economics tells VOA China’s economy will likely continue to slow, but gradually. “We’re not concerned about a hard landing. Policy makers have all the tools in their hands to step in and support growth if they want to. What they’re trying to achieve is a balancing act between slowing credit growth and achieving regional growth.”Many see the slowdown partly as a result of China’s limiting of credit expansion, which fueled much of China’s growth in the past.Scott Kennedy, a China specialist with Indiana University, agrees there will be no “hard landing.” He tells VOA China’s economy has a “very good foundation for rapid growth for a long time.”"A growing number of people are getting better educated. Transportation and logistics to western China are expanding. A variety of reforms are being undertaken. So there are a plenty of good reasons for thinking this economy’s high growth period hasn’t come to an end yet.”China’s economy is attempting to rebound from a prolonged slowdown, which follows three decades of staggering growth.

Credit: Voice of America

Armed Pro-Russians Push into Ukrainian Towns

Armored personnel carriers with armed men riding on top and flying Russian flags rolled into the Ukrainian city of Sloviansk near the Russian border Wednesday. Some of the men claim they are Ukrainian soldiers who have switched sides to the pro-Russians who already control several government buildings in town.Also, armed pro-Russians have taken over the mayor’s office and the city council building in Donetsk — another city where separatists demand referendums on splitting with Ukraine to join Russia.Ukraine launched what it calls an anti-terrorist operation Tuesday to try to take back the government buildings seized by the protesters.There are different reports on whether shots were fired, if there are any casualties, and who controls what.Russian President Vladimir Putin says the growing crisis in Ukraine has brought the country to the brink of civil war.The Kremlin says Mr. Putin made his comment during a telephone call Tuesday with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.President Putin accused the Ukrainian government of pursuing an “anti-constitutional” path by using force against the pro-Russian demonstrators who have taken over official buildings in 10 southeastern Ukrainian towns and cities.The Kremlin says the Russian and German leaders hope Thursday’s talks in Geneva between the European Union, Russia, Ukraine, and the United States will show the importance of finding a peaceful solution.

Credit: Voice of America

China Shadow Looms Over Bid to Scrap Tiananmen Crackdown Museum in Hong Kong

A planned museum dedicated to the brutal crackdown on China’s Tiananmen Square pro-democracy protests has run into a legal challenge in Hong Kong that some say is motivated by pro-China interests ahead of the 25th anniversary of the bloodshed.   The former British colony of Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule in 1997 but remains a free-wheeling, capitalist hub whose annual candelight vigils on June 4 set it apart from mainland China, where all public commemorations are banned.   Discussion of the Tiananmen Square crackdown is still taboo in China, where on June 3 and June 4, 1989, its leaders ordered troops to open fire on demonstrators and sent in tanks to crush a student-led campaign movement, killing hundreds.   But 17 years since Hong Kong was handed back to China, a bid to establish the world’s first permanent museum dedicated to the crackdown in an 800-sq-ft, fifth-floor unit in a commercial tower has been opposed by the owners’ committee.   The spat could escalate into a broader headache for Beijing amid rising resentment over China’s tightening control over the city’s affairs and calls for universal suffrage.   The ability of Hong Kong residents to debate the June 4 crackdown remains a potent symbol of the city’s freedoms and civil liberties relative to Communist Party-ruled China.   The museum, now being renovated by construction workers and due to open in late April, will feature photographs, a goddess of democracy and other documentary materials chronicling the crackdown.   The Chinese demonstrators built the goddess statue as a symbol of their struggle, and it has been replicated at June 4 anniversaries in Hong Kong.   An owner’s committee of the Foo Hoo Center, where the museum is located, voted last Wednesday to bar it from opening, claiming in a legal document seen by Reuters that units should only be used for offices.   ‘Political problem’   “We anticipate and have a real concern that your proposed use of the 5th floor will operate as a lightning rod and attract to the building and its vicinity an inordinate number of visitors, both supporters and detractors,” the letter, issued from the solicitors’ office of Tung, Ng, Tse & Heung, stated.   One tenant, the Chiu Chau Plastic Manufacturers Association, voiced explicit opposition to the plan. Its secretary general, Yeung Cho-ming, told the South China Morning Post that the museum was “definitely a political problem.”   “The [June 4 incident] is sensitive and contentious. We are afraid the museum will bring us trouble. Someone might protest here and affect our daily operations,” he was quoted as saying.   The group behind the museum said the legal threat was being orchestrated by those with loyalties to China.   “This is obviously a politically motivated lawsuit,” said Lee Cheuk-yan, a local lawmaker and head of the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China, the group that organizes the June 4 candlelight vigil each year.   The alliance bought the fifth floor of the office tower for $1.25 million last December, with a mission to preserve the memory of June 4 and to seek redress and accountability from Beijing’s Communist Party leaders for those killed.   Beijing maintains the democracy movement was a “counter-revolutionary event,” a denunciation protesters want overturned.   Lee said the owners of two businesses in the building, Man Lee Electrical Co. and Reer Garment Manufactory Ltd, had told the owners’ committee they would pay the legal fees for the lawsuit out of their own pocket. Neither company was willing to comment when Reuters visited their offices in the building.   “I don’t think any sensible person would use his own money to start a lawsuit, so there must be someone behind. Of course they would not divulge who is behind them,” Lee added.   Mak Hoi Wah, a vice-chairman of the alliance, said 54 of 60 votes cast during last week’s owners’ committee meeting backed the legal challenge against the museum.   The current president of the Chiu Chau Plastic Manufacturers Association, Lam Chun-hong, is a member of China’s top political consultative body, the CPPCC, in southwestern Yunnan province, according to a membership list published by the Xinhua state news agency.   Its honorary life president is Hong Kong billionaire and Asia’s richest man, Li Ka-shing, according to its website.   There was no immediate comment from Li on whether he backed the legal challenge when contacted through his firm, Hutchison Whampoa.   Earlier this year, Li warned that a planned “Occupy Central” protest to shut down the central business district to press for full democracy would damage the financial hub   Despite fears the narrow building might be overrun with visitors, some tenants didn’t see a problem.   “I don’t mind,” said Tong Chun-sing, who works for a design firm. “It won’t affect our business.”

Credit: Voice of America